Connect with us

Headlines

Gianfranco Ferré Dies in Milan

Italian fashion designer who headed a French couture house was 62

Published

on

Italian fashion designer Gianfranco Ferré died Sunday night in Milan. He was 62.

Ferré suffered a brain hemorrhage on Friday. Doctors at San Raffaele hospital confirmed his death, according to the Italian news agency ANSA.

Ferré went from being one of Italy’s leading fashion designers to being lead designer for the French fashion house of Christian Dior, a rare honor for a non-French designer.

Ferré was born in 1944, in Milan. He studied architecture at the Milan Polytechnic Institute but, after graduating in 1969, began designing accessories for established companies like Walter Albini and Christiane Bailly. In 1974, he started his own fashion company, and launched his signature collection in 1978. In 1989, he was hired by the French luxury-goods executive Bernard Arnault to replace the designer Marc Bohan at Christian Dior. At the time, the hiring of a non-French designer was considered scandalous. According to Ferré’s obituary in The New York Times, Pierre Bergé, Yves Saint Laurent’s business partner, said, “I don’t think that opening the doors to a foreigner — and an Italian — is respecting the spirit of creativity in France.”

After several years, Ferré had established a respectable business at Dior, causing its couture to grow in size and prestige comparable to that of Saint Laurent. “Back then, the fact that I was Italian created lots of problems,” Ferré told Women’s Wear Daily in an interview in February. “Luckily, though, my French wasn’t that bad.”

Advertisement

Advertisement

SPONSORED VIDEO

Embracing Whole-Brained Thinking in the Design Journey

Strategy needs creative, and creative needs strategy—yep, having both is really the only way of unifying all disciplines with a common vernacular with an eye toward building a strong creative vision that is foundational to the processes. Hear from Bevan Bloemendaal, former VP, Global Environments & Creative Services at Timberland, how to connect the dots between disciplines, claiming and creating a clear differentiation for the brand and ensuring that any asset (experience, product, ad, store, office, home, video, game) is created with intention.

Promoted Headlines

Most Popular